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"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere …” | Martin Luther King Jr. 

20, 012 students across Canada saw You Can't Break My Spirit: The Colours of Justice from February 2nd to June 15th, 2018.

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Jerusha
Actress
Ms. Oak
Sandy
Actor
Mark Warrior
Prison Guard
Joy
Actress
Ms. Oak
Freskella
Christi
Actress
Plea Court Judge
Belissa
Actress
Freskella
Barry
Actor
Judge
Tarique
Actor
H.Roy Wellington
Judge A. Irving
Dimitry
Actor
Conniving Crown
Duty Counsel
Deanna
Actress
Ms. Oak
David
Actor
Prison Guard
Jeff
Actor
Duty Counsel
Mr. Goldberg
Teddy
Actress
Prison Guard
S. Komonen
Maiya
Actress
Cindy
Maria
Actress
Coniving Crown
Duty Counsel
Sharon
Actress
Mary
Giddings
H. Roy Wellington
Vivian
Actress
Cindy
Dishonest Crown
Meghan Scott
Zaakirah
Actress
Conniving Crown
Sarah De Filippis
Aida
Actress
Inmate
Stephanie
Actress
Dishonest Crown
Meghan Scott
Jenna
Actress
Samara
Court Clerk
Ms. Oak
Mona
Actress
Mary
Court Clerk
Jasnoor
Actress
Freskella
S. Komonen
Lily
Actress
Court Clerk
Olivia
Actress
Inmate
Hasina
Actress
Rohinie
Court Clerk
Claudette
Actress
Judge A. Irving
Court Clerk
Audrey
Actress
Conniving Crown
Sarah De Filippis
Shanti
Actress
Bobby
Actor
Mark Warrior
Duty Counsel
Rosalyn
Actress
Court Clerk
Jordan
Actor
H.Roy Wellington
Judge A. Irving
Leanne
Actress
Judge
Prison Guard
Freskella
Kristina
Actress
Cindy
Conniving Crown
Sarah De Filippis
You Can't Break My Spirit Play

Dear Partners in creating a better society,

Equal Justice Canada has been partnering with school boards across Canada and internationally to bring innovative, engaging and relevant values based Social Justice programs, plays and conferences. In November 2017, EJC purchased a license to produce "You Can't Break My Spirit: Colors of Justice" an inspiring riveting play based on real life events in Toronto. The celebratory Social Justice play teaches children and youth to care about others, to want to change the world for the better and to want to have freedom in its true sense for every individual in the world!

"I would like to be remembered as a person who wanted to be free ... so other people would also be free."
- Rosa Parks

The play, Colours of Justice, examines the justice system and asks,
"Is It Just?" If it is unjust, how can we work together to make it better? During this explorative and educational process, the inspiring play "Colours of Justice" teaches children and youth to discuss, research and create a justice system that would actually work and achieve equality in our society.

SCHOOLS: This inspiring play is about a modern day Harriet Tubman who goes undercover into the criminal justice system. She helps change the laws, liberating many children, youth and adults from prison, giving them hope and a license to a new life. "You Can't Break My Spirit: The Colours of Justice" is a short novel adapted into a Play by Equal Justice Canada staff and Donna Michelle Bernard. "You Can't Break My Spirit" is about creating Love, Understanding and Victory in the midst of challenges.

SYNOPSIS: A young brown woman goes undercover into the Toronto Justice system so she can understand the experience of the people she serves in her missionary work. She expects to be released from jail after one night, but instead is trapped in a system that will only release you if you plead guilty, or have tens of thousands of dollars to pay lawyers who are experts who are well connected and are experts in their field.

The faces around her are vulnerable and aggressive souls who have given up on any possibility of having a normal life, people who have lost everything; they are casually sacrificing their souls for momentary freedom, while being trapped in a cycle that seeks to destroy them. The protagonist encounters dishonesty, systemic and overt racism, politics, and injustices within the legal system, finally uncovering a system that does not work efficiently at every level. As she searches for solutions she finds the true meaning of love, courage and dignity. The protagonist's bravery, determination and persistent faith at every step of the journey is, in the end, rewarded after spending two hundred thousand dollars and fighting for the freedom to live her life on her own terms.

This exciting play, "You Can't Break My Spirit: Colours of Justice," has been vetted and admired by school boards across Canada.

For more information or questions regarding the event, feel free to contact us at: Irene@equaljusticecanada.ca

Ticket costs are affordably priced at $11.00 per student and $26.00 for adults. Discount on tickets are available for schools.We want to work with you so we can make sure your students do not miss out on this unforgettable play.

Thank you,

Equal Justice Canada

Focus on Pre-teens and Diverse Youth in Play


Question and Answer

REVIEW of June 13, 2018 "You Can't Break My Spirit: The Colours of Justice" play at Artscape in Toronto, Ontario

by Margot Van Sluytman
For Equal Justice Canada
Wednesday, June 13th, 2018

"Why is the justice system so mean?"

This was one of the many poignant questions from an audience member sitting at ArtSpace on a warm Tuesday afternoon Toronto. That audience was a roomful of students, aged 11-13, their teachers, the lighting crew of one, the stage director.

As I sat in the balcony looking on and listening to the words flow from the actors on the stage, I was catapulted back, back, back, to when I as a sixteen year old girl, whose sisters were nine and eighteen, and whose brother was five, found out about the murder of our Father at a store in Toronto, forty years ago.

What questions might we have asked? And, I wondered at the richness of the fact that the children in that audience were offered such a rich opportunity, particularly at a time when retribution appears to be trumping resilience and reconciliation. If respect.

The gifted actors took us, an enraptured audience, into Canada's Court System, where judges, crown, duty counsel, lawyers, wardens, and young, young women tangled in an, at times, horrific dance of (in)justice. Sitting in a small, smelly, cell with four female inmates, listening to their stories of what got them into that cell, meant being thrown into a mad-making-machine of menace and woe. Of callousness. Of dread. And, of learning with them that our spirits are solid, sound, and will not, easily be broken.

Through the eyes of Mrs. Oaks, the main character, who experienced horrendous racism, sexism, and banal brutality, the young audience reacted and responded to the visceral injustice of the ill-treatment of the inmates. And, when I held on to the mic and said, "Even a victim of brutal crime does not support any form of injustice, brutality, and sexism in Canada's prison system," explaining that as a young person my family was a victim of crime, the audience applauded. And applauded.

I was moved to tears, because what was clear me, was that those young people understood, in large part because of the exquisite script and acting in, You Can't Break My Spirit: The Colours of Justice, the importance of their voices, their choices, and their capacity to be a part of challenging and changing Canada's Justice System.